Insightful News


We are an addiction for those who love reading.


Insightful News

Reddit campaign suggests electing Single-A catcher to MLB All-Star Game


Baseball isn’t immune to attempts of bizarre All-Star campaigns.
Peter G. Aiken-USA TODAY Sports

All-Star voting always provides an opportunity for fans to get a bit mischievous and baseball fans are no different.

One fan on Reddit suggested in a post that has since been deleted that fans coalesce around John Bormann, a catcher in the Pittsburgh Pirates’ minor league system. Bormann was an emergency call-up on April 30, with the team needing a warm body after Francisco Cervelli got hurt. Bormann was with the team’s Single-A affiliate in Bradenton, the closest minor league affiliate to Miami, where the team was set to play that evening. Bormann was called up, struck out in one at bat, and then sent right back to Bradenton.

However, as Samer Kalaf of Deadspin notes, it still means Bormann has big league experience, which could make him an All-Star. The league office clarified that the only prerequisite is that a player must be on an active roster on the final day of games before the All-Star Game. Bormann isn’t and probably won’t be, but if a viral marketing campaign began, the Pirates could take notice and make it so. Major League Baseball also has the power to veto any fan vote if they see fit to.

The campaign doesn’t look to have gained traction, and isn’t really a campaign, even — more an idea floated online. It probably won’t get far, but there is precedent for All-Star balloting campaigns for players who don’t really belong.

MORE FROM YARDBARKER:

25 SLIDES
25 unlikely MLB playoff heroes from the past


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/4/c/4c8c660216ad83f8b85dde97b57569e06b4b349e/xl/2.jpg’,
title: ‘1969: Al Weis, Mets’,
description: ‘

After hitting only .215 during the regular season, Weis sparked the Mets during the 1969 World Series by hitting .455 with a 1.290 OPS. New York went on to win the Series in five games.

Focus on Sport / Focus on Sport


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/2/f/2f61c80e03693c599fb07c4dff2316ce60d02227/xl/3.jpg’,
title: ‘1972: Gene Tenace, A’s’,
description: ‘

Tenace hit only .225 in 1972 for Oakland but won World Series MVP after hitting four homers and nine RBI. He went on to become an offensive force the following year, hitting 24 homers for Oakland.

Focus on Sport / Focus on Sport


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/b/d/bdee582012c8f9be99a30cfca305b73f683a687e/xl/92295610.jpg’,
title: ‘1978: Jim Beattie, Yankees’,
description: ‘

Beattie had a career ERA above 4.00, but he was spectacular for the Yankees during the 1978 playoffs. He started two games during the playoffs, including a complete-game win in the World Series.

John Iacono / Sports Illustrated


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/1/4/141d4889aad7dd48781b7d862d1f365bc7891184/xl/5.jpg’,
title: ‘1978: Bucky Dent, Yankees’,
description: ‘

The light-hitting Dent hit an improbable home run in the one-game playoff to determine the AL East Champion. The Yankees went on to win the World Series in 1978.

Focus on Sport / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/c/c/ccbf300d2f3aeaa64777d890d1e3919604b69fe1/xl/6.jpg’,
title: ‘1985: Don Denkinger’,
description: ‘

Denkinger’s long umpiring career will forever be defined by his bad call in the 1985 World Series. Umpiring at first base, he called Royals DH Jorge Orta safe at first base in the ninth inning with the Cardinals leading the game 1-0 and the series 3-2. The Royals went on to win the game and the series.

Rich Pilling / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/5/8/5832f0c0f62fbd7fa47faf87ea9dcd7428b5a33a/xl/7.jpg’,
title: ‘1985: Jim Sundberg, Royals’,
description: ‘

Sundberg didn’t pile up stats in the 1985 playoffs, but he played a pivotal role in the ALCS vs. Toronto and slid into home to help the Royals win Game 6 of the World Series.

Ronald C. Modra/Sports Imagery / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/e/6/e6f5cb09ba17a6fe71552dcb9192011a1c51c315/xl/8.jpg’,
title: ‘1985: Ozzie Smith, Cardinals’,
description: ‘

Smith is now a Hall of Famer, but that certainly wasn’t for his power with 28 career home runs. However, Smith won Game 5 for the Cardinals in the NLCS and was named series MVP.

Focus on Sport / Focus on Sport


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/e/4/e4c72a250504bfb77ec6cec01f2370a087edf445/xl/9.jpg’,
title: ‘1988: Kirk Gibson, Dodgers’,
description: ‘

Unlikely to play in Game 1 of the 1988 World Series, Gibson emerged from the tunnel at Dodger Stadium to become the hero. He hit a game-winning home run off Dennis Eckersley in a series the Dodgers went on to win in five games.

Focus on Sport / Focus on Sport


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/c/8/c8c91203ead535ce86c1839cd471ecaf0eaab1a9/xl/10.jpg’,
title: ‘1990: Billy Hatcher, Reds’,
description: ‘

Hatcher made an incredible contribution for the Reds in the 1990 World Series, catching fire to hit .750 in four games after hitting only .276 with five homers during the regular season.

Otto Greule Jr. / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/9/d/9dd695cf3212cbe3f9f3842efbfff6a14ddf8057/xl/11.jpg’,
title: ‘1992: Ed Sprague, Blue Jays’,
description: ‘

Sprague didn’t contribute much for Toronto during the 1992 season until Game 2 of the World Series. Trailing by two runs, he launched a two-run game-winning homer vs. the Braves.

Chris Wilkins / AFP


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/2/9/297a36677b5dfcac8ce6934718fc49d45867509e/xl/12.jpg’,
title: ‘1996: Jeffrey Maier’,
description: ‘

In Game 1 of the 1996 ALCS, a 13-year-old fan sitting in the right field stands reached over the wall to pull a “home run” over Tony Tarasco’s head. The Yankees went on to win the game and eventually the World Series.

Timothy Clary / AFP


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/2/5/253e294a4709b261e400e38f3e6d408a26f257b2/xl/13.jpg’,
title: ‘1996: Jim Leyritz, Yankees’,
description: ‘

Leyritz hit a game-tying homer in Game 4 of the 1996 World Series. The homer eventually allowed the Yankees to tie the series at two games and win it in six games vs. Atlanta.

Stephen Dunn / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/a/f/afdbc7b5606e898db4914d14f09a4187e276d307/xl/14.jpg’,
title: ‘2002: Adam Kennedy, Angels’,
description: ‘

A youthful 26-year-old second baseman at the time, Kennedy hit only seven home runs in 144 games during the 2002 season. He almost singlehandedly won Game 5 of the ALCS by hitting three homers.

Brian Bahr / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/8/d/8d0d5e1c022c0de0595246b1abe762790be21025/xl/15.jpg’,
title: ‘2002: Francisco Rodriguez, Angels’,
description: ‘

A relatively unknown 20-year-old relief pitcher, Rodriguez had only five appearances late in the 2002 season. He was lights-out during the postseason, however, allowing four earned runs in 18.2 innings with 28 strikeouts. He went on to become an elite closer by 2005.

Jeff Gross / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/d/8/d8338137a9c332940a43d01b3b9304ed5accd5f5/xl/16.jpg’,
title: ‘2003: Steve Bartman’,
description: ‘

Considered more as a scapegoat for the Cubs’ failures in the 2003 NLCS, Bartman is legendary in Chicago. The poor guy reached over in left field foul ground to take an out from Cubs outfield Moises Alou. Ahead 3-2 in the series, the Cubs went on to give up eight runs in the inning and eventually lose the series to the Marlins.

Elsa / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/a/e/aeacd680f70cc99ef32aae0ed709bd20c34b1172/xl/17.jpg’,
title: ‘2003: Aaron Boone, Yankees’,
description: ‘

Red Sox fans aren’t fond of Boone after he ended the ALCS in 2003. Boone launched a walk-off homer to win Game 7 in the 11th inning.

Al Bello / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/9/5/95075e44949cdd0d0172c9f1eb70ae60189c2e42/xl/18.jpg’,
title: ‘2004: Dave Roberts, Red Sox’,
description: ‘

Roberts had possibly the most important stolen base in baseball history. He swiped second base off Mariano Rivera in Game 4 of the ALCS with the Red Sox facing elimination, down by one run in the ninth inning. Roberts eventually came around to score, and the Red Sox won four straight games before knocking off the Cardinals in the World Series.

Jed Jacobsohn / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/1/f/1f7a4495a5dec3c6425601256e81e73dac829b6a/xl/19.jpg’,
title: ‘2005: Geoff Blum, White Sox’,
description: ‘

Blum had a long career as a utility infielder with a sub-.700 OPS for his career. He had only one at-bat during the 2005 World Series, but it was a big one with a home run to win Game 3.

John Grieshop / Major League Baseball


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/c/b/cbc2a97758c4b1074d5c400cbaa2880672f5f7b1/xl/20.jpg’,
title: ‘2006: David Eckstein, Cardinals’,
description: ‘

Playing in his second World Series, the scrappy Eckstein was a catalyst for the Cardinals. He hit .364 and won World Series MVP.

Rich Pilling / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/a/4/a4ab1e80f6d3d838b59188521f9b2a589de02e7c/xl/21.jpg’,
title: ‘2006: Jeff Suppan, Cardinals’,
description: ‘

The 2006 Cardinals were arguably the worst team to ever win the Series, and they wouldn’t have done it without Suppan. He was the NLCS MVP, hurling two great starts vs. the Mets and allowing only one run in 15 innings.

Dilip Vishwanat / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/a/6/a6e516d9ccd26e139f1c471e92f22ddc3ecf4e41/xl/22.jpg’,
title: ‘2007: Mike Lowell, Red Sox’,
description: ‘

Lowell had one of his best seasons in 2007, but he still wasn’t the centerpiece of Boston’s lineup. He went on an incredible run in the 2007 World Series, posting a 1.300 OPS and winning World Series MVP.

Jamie Squire / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/4/e/4e1dcf5b4c2306687867c5f3633e6c3bd2915e89/xl/23.jpg’,
title: ‘2010: Cody Ross, Giants’,
description: ‘

Giants fans will always have fond memories of Ross during his one-plus years in San Francisco. Ross hit five homers during the team’s playoff run in 2010 and won NLCS MVP.

Jeff Zelevansky / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/8/5/853e5985c7fa3230054a840d5030aa8e903dc4ec/xl/24.jpg’,
title: ‘2011: David Freese, Cardinals’,
description: ‘

Freese came up big in Game 6 of the 2011 World Series, arguably the greatest game in World Series history. Freese tied the Rangers in the ninth inning with a two-run triple before hitting a walk-off homer in the 11th inning. He went on to win World Series MVP.

Rob Carr / Getty Images


}
,
{
src: ‘/media/4/8/4879e5b78e2d0174e965782ce304acfe51fb6a80/xl/25.jpg’,
title: ‘2012: Daniel Descalso, Cardinals’,
description: ‘

The Cardinals shocked the Nationals during the 2012 NLDS with a come-from-behind Game 5 win, and Descalso made a big contribution with a home run and game-tying single.

G Fiume / Getty Images


}
],
gallery: {
enabled: true,
preload: [0,2],
},
image: {
markup:
”+

‘+
”+

‘+

‘+
”+

‘+
”+

25 unlikely MLB playoff heroes from the past

‘+
‘+

‘+

‘+
”+

‘+

‘+


},
callbacks: {
change: function() {
if (this.isOpen) {
this.wrap.addClass(‘mfp-open’);
}
},
beforeChange: function() {
createAd();
},
imageLoadComplete: function() {
if (adIsEditable) {
var url = ‘http://www.yardbarker.com/asset/asset_source/2731’;
loadAsset(“2731”, url);
adIsEditable = false;
}

repositionAd();

// only reload the ad at most every X seconds
setTimeout(“adIsEditable = true;”, 12000);
jQuery(“.mfp-wrap”).scroll(function(){
repositionAd();
});
},
resize: function() {
if (adFrame) {
repositionAd();
}
},
close: function() {
if (adFrame) {
adFrame.remove();
adFrame = null;
}
}
},
type: ‘image’ // this is default type
});



Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *